Sessions Declares War On Weed- Legalization Derailed.

Is Jeff Sessions coming after medical cannabis?

The simple answer is, As fast and as hard as he can.

Jeff Sessions hates cannabis. He hates cannabis much more than he hates, say, racism. He once jested of the Ku Klux Klan that he “thought they were okay, until he heard they smoked marijuana”.

So since he ended up the Attorney General, he’s using his power to lash out at something he hates.

But the real question is why? Science has proven it to be a highly effective treatment for a whole galaxy of different ailments. It also has no harmful side effects and is non-addictive. When you take it away from people, they end up on painkillers and after that heroin. There’s a heroin epidemic.

He’s filling prisons up with people for heroin already. The prisons are full. They are so full that states are desperate to somehow clear up bed space. There are more than two million people in some phase of our incarceration machine as these words are written. Many things are terribly wrong.

As the Attorney General, it is incumbent on Mr Sessions to use his power to solve these kinds of problems.

The War on Drugs has been the biggest failure in American history. In spite of all attempts to regulate man’s appetites with legislature the problem has continued to grow. It’s high time it was brought to an end, and every sensible person is aware of this.

Including Jeff Sessions.

The War on Drugs has never been about drugs. It’s about power. Who’s got it, and who’s going to keep it.

One of their most useful strategies is to hamstring young people who are likely to be Democratic leaders and voters later in life. If they can hang a tag on you as a drug offender, they can disqualify you from holding office in the eyes of many.

If they can make you a felon with a weed case, they can stop you from voting. Millennials, ask yourselves: How many smart, cool people do you know who have had to do time over drugs? That is no accident.

Sessions knows full well that many on the left smoke pot. This is about hurting Trump’s enemies.

“The Nixon campaign in 1968, and the Nixon White House after that, had two enemies: the antiwar left and black people,” said former Nixon domestic policy chief John Ehrlichman.
“You understand what I’m saying? We knew we couldn’t make it illegal to be either against the war or black, but by getting the public to associate the hippies with marijuana and blacks with heroin. And then criminalizing both heavily, we could disrupt those communities,” Ehrlichman said. “We could arrest their leaders. raid their homes, break up their meetings, and vilify them night after night on the evening news.”
Ehrlichman’s comment was the first time the war on drugs was so starkly characterized as a political assault designed to help Nixon win, and keep, the White House.
Nixon’s public explanation for his first piece of legislation in the war on drugs was delivered in a message to Congress in July 1969. The law was framed as a response to an increase in heroin addiction and the rising use of marijuana by students.
We’ve been here before.
Rep. Earl Blumenthal (D-OR), one of Congress’s biggest advocates for legalization, blasted the “outrageous” new guidelines as “perhaps one of the stupidest decisions the Attorney General has made” in a statement, and stupid it may be.

But it’s consistent with his ideology and the political strategies employed by his generation. There is no doubt whatsoever he will do all the harm he can to the cannabis industry.
So basically, where we’ve come to now, is a state of affairs in which you pay taxes on the weed you buy at the store- but you can still go to prison for it. It is the opinion of Millennial Democrats that everyone should go back to being very, very careful. For no good reason whatsoever.
What a world.
Coretta Scott King, the widow of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr., urged Congress in a letter to block the 1986 nomination of Jeff Sessions as federal judge, saying that allowing him to join the federal bench would “irreparably damage the work of my husband.”
Today, on Martin Luther King Day, let’s take a few minutes to remember that.

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