Sessions’ Short Memory, and the Campaign Chaos Defense.

Donald Trump met with Vladimir Putin on his trip to Asia last week and endorsed his denial of hacking interference in our election. The intelligence agencies of America, who have unilaterally concluded otherwise, were thus laughed at and disregarded, by the President of the United States of America, in favor of an offhanded denial from the Russian president. It’s a sickening state of affairs.

Robert Mueller’s team dropped many a bomb this week, however. After the dust settles, there’s reason to hope for an early end. A number of former Watergate prosecutors believe that Mueller has all he needs already. All he has to do is gain access to the email inboxes of Jared Kushner, Stephen Miller, Hope Hicks and others. Kushner, for one, has been sending hundreds of emails from a private server ever since January.

With all the documentation of Russian collusion piling up, Trump’s best excuse so far may be that his people were too incompetent to organize a conspiracy. They are running out of plausible lies to tell. And so, for once, they’ve decided to tell the truth. The Slob Defense has been born.

A not-guilty-by-reason-of-stupidity defense has the virtue in this case of being plausible, but since when has ignorance been an excuse in our legal system? It’s true that Donald Trump Jr. is not an intelligent man, but why should he catch a break because of it? He’s been given every advantage. How often do poor people beat a case due to similar limitations? About as often as Donald Trump Sr. tells the truth.

We’ve known about the meeting he had with Russian lawyer Natalia Veselnitskaya last year, to collect the “dirt” they had gathered on Hillary Clinton. He wasn’t very careful about hiding it, and he blurted out all he knew when questioned. That was huge. Yesterday’s revelations about Trump Jr’s private electronic conversations with Julian Assange of Wikileaks register on a similar scale.

Trump Jr. exchanged multiple private messages on Twitter with Wikileaks before the election. In several cases, it appears he acted on requests from the group. In one instance he tweeted a link it had sent his way.

This is solid proof that the Trump campaign was in direct contact with WikiLeaks, described by Trump’s own CIA director as “a non-state hostile intelligence service often abetted by state actors like Russia.”

At the time, both WikiLeaks and its founder, Julian Assange, were under tremendous scrutiny for their role in disseminating stolen Democratic emails.The earliest known conversations with Trump Jr. were held just before their release.

Donald Trump Jr. is certainly having a rough week, but he is not the only member of the Trump clan under the Mueller microscope.

Jared Kushner has turned over all documents pertinent to his connection with the firing of then- FBI director James Comey earlier this year to Special Counsel Robert Mueller. Kushner is said to be persona non grata around the Trump household these days. For all his blundering, though, he has made at least one important contribution to the Donald Trump administration.

His pleas of ignorance have inspired a pathetic go-to defense in the face of collusion charges. Over the summer, Kushner explained to congressional investigators, the Trump campaign was chaotic and disorganized to a miserable extent. So miserable, in fact, that even something as significant as a meeting between him and a number of other campaign aides and individuals with Russian ties didn’t even register.

We will not neglect to mention the email defense. Hillary Clinton was all but burned in effigy over the supposed carelessness of her handling of emails. In the Trump administration, carelessness is a best-case scenario.

“It was typical for me to receive 200 or more e-mails a day during the campaign. I did not have the time to read every one, especially long e-mails from unknown senders or e-mail chains to which I was added at some later point in the exchange,” Kushner said, claiming that he did not read an e-mail outlining the Russian effort to bolster Trump’s candidacy.

For a guy who claims to be a genius, he’s sure got a lousy memory.

Thus was born the Trump campaign’s chaos defense. Other aides have recognized in it their lifesaver, and are all rushing around vigorously, screaming out the tales of their incompetence. Anything to deflect from their own suspicious contacts and memory lapses.

Jeff Sessions spent the whole afternoon employing this technique. He was faced with a rough slate of questions, especially when Rep. Ted Lieu (D-CA) told Sessions flat out that he’s lying, either to the Senate or the House.

“That is exactly the opposite answer you gave under oath to the U.S. Senate,” Lieu replied, referencing Sessions’s Jan. 10 confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee. “Either you’re lying to the U.S. Senate, or you’re lying to the U.S. House of Representatives.”

The House Judiciary Committee was prompted in their inquiry by a series of fresh revelations from campaign advisers George Papadopoulos and Carter Page, two other guys who spent some hours in front of that committee as of late.

The attorney general tried blaming his own short memory on the sloven and incompetence that surrounded Donald Trump during last year’s election.

“It was a form of chaos every day from day one,” Sessions told the committee. That statement does not adequately fill hearts with confidence.

Collusion notwithstanding, there’s always the 25th Amendment. If thirteen Cabinet members and a Vice-President who would like to escape the wrath to come will simply vote the President out as incompetent, it is not too late for them. They had better act fast, though. The other doors are all closing.

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